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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he was 81 years old. >> he never became hollywood. larry hagman remained dallas. he was from fort worth and he always will stand for dallas. what a legend. love that guy. >> check in with rick reichmuth and see what our weekend first alert forecast looks like. >> looking good. you worry about thanksgiving weekend for travelers getting home and maybe another storm at the end of it we made through the entire thing scot-free. it's cold. 13 degrees in minneapolis. the tenks have dropped off from where you were on wednesday. aside from that, no big storms. cold front eastern seaboard. behind it a ton of sunshine. there will be a
passed away friday in a dallas hospital after battling complications from cancer. his j.r. ewing course, of the tomorrow villain oil man on the long- running abc tv show and dallas was only part of his acting repertoire. but it guaranteed his legend in tv history. a season finale cliff hanger in the 1980 called who shot j.r. was fuelled by 350 million people in 57 countries. that actor was up more noble enough that hagman recently used his j.r. role on the new version of dallas. he was also on the '60s popular tv series i dream of jeannie and acted on broadway. hagman, the son of broadway actress mary martin was 81 years old. >> it did get crowded roughly 11,000 people have been in line. this was up from $9 and led a share a lot of the black friday wrapped up at dawn. there was drama at a victoria's secret store where people jammed in the doorway waiting for the store to open. off some of them were pushing and shoving. the door man pleaded for them to stay, and that she would not open the door to this simmer down. employees stated that the waffle iron cause riots. this mall the michigan
drama "dallas." a rather nasty guy that people loved to hate. before that, he played a nice guy, captain tony nelson on "i dream of jeannie." he appeared here on "today" last june, and we'll have a look back at his life and career next. >> a legend, absolutely. >>> it is the day after black friday and people were going crazy hunting for bargains, so as you do your shopping this weekend, we'll reveal some ingenious tricks retailers use to get you to spend more and more of your hard-earned cash. >>> speaking of shopping, today is small business saturday. a day for you to support the local mom and pop shops in your town. you can do it every day, of course. something very important to new york city mayor michael bloomberg, who will join us to talk about it in our next half hour. >>> then an unusual punishment for a convicted killer in oklahoma. a teenager was sentenced to spend ten years in church after pleading guilty to manslaughter. the ruling has sparked a legal dispute and we'll hear from both sides in that case. >>> a bit later, we'll switch gears with a look at tonight's power ball ja
owens, abc news, dallas. >> our thanks to ryan. glad to see that reunion today. >>> overseas tonight, and to the middle east now, that truce between israel and hamas holding. but now, a brewing crisis in egypt. giant protests because of their new leader and what he's done. president mohamed morsi, seen here with secretary of state hillary clinton, helping to broker that truce, but right after, a push from morsi for more power. many of the people of egypt said not so fast, and the protests are growing now. abc's matt gutman in the region again tonight for us. >> reporter: with massive protests, a cloud of tier gas, egypt is again in turmoil tonight. the violence, a reaction to egypt's first democratically elected leader, mohamed morsi, declaring all his presidential decisions are exempt from appeal or review by law makers or the courts. protesters torching a muslim brother office in alexandria and mohamed elle bar are detweeting, he appointed himself egypt's new f farrow. >> just months ago, morsi was obscure before being elected in may, shooting to international prominence this week
. and in cities like chicago, dallas, miami, milwaukee and los angeles, it could happen as early as today. meanwhile, best buy employees are firing up for the big day with training drills. >> this is what live for. this is what i love to do. >> reporter: in places like wisconsin, california, and florida, shoppers have already started camping out. some already planning to eat thanksgiving dinner in line. >> thanksgiving, mom comes out with the plates and stuff and we've got everything that you have on a normal thanksgiving table. >> reporter: these early birds are ready to pounce on door-busting deals. from $78 flat screen tvs at walmart and $100 cameras at target which are going to match amazon. >> electronics are going to be huge again. the ipad mini, everybody wants. the ipod 5. for kids a leappad2, like an ipad for kids. >> george, to give you an idea how excited they are thursday night. the first 200 shoppers will be give a $30 gift bag for holiday shopping. what every they want to do about it. but stocking stuffers. >> already lining up. thank you, bianna. >>> and now switching gears
-school in dallas or houston, we want to be able to admit that students. the university of texas is saying we want to consider race sometimes and that is what the dispute is about. the critics say, no, it is wrong to consider race and you don't need to do it in this case. you've got a reasonable amount of racial diversity. host: let's turn to another case -- as you enter that, i will show that had line from "the wall street journal." answer to't know the that question. i think it would be unlikely, however. justice scalia is 76 and justice kennedy is 76. they are both generally on the right side of the court. justice ruth better ginsburg will be 80 in the spring. she is the oldest of the justices on the liberal side. if you had to guess who was going to leave in the next four years, i think the standard guess would be justice ginsburg. it was very important for the ideological makeup of the court whether barack obama or mitt romney is president of united states because it justice ginsburg had left and another conservative justice came in, that could have changed the balance of the court. if, in th
in places like dallas, your first frost and freeze in the dallas metro area. and new york city, dropping from the 70s in the new york city area, into probably much cooler than that, the 30s and 40s in that zone as we get the cold air. chicago feels like 16 degrees with the windchill. and atlanta, feels like 27. that's a real big shot of cold air. >>> all right. coming up on "gma," sorry about that. the high school valedictorian on trial for his mother's murder. why his father tells abc news his son is innocent. >>> plus, the double-life of the bandanna bandit. wait until you hear this story. ou hear this story. nine days till christmas and eddy said the toys might not be ready! eddy? the elf! ♪ [ radio announcer ] today's forecast: it's snowing snowballs and snow bricks out there... seven more days and it's snowing snow bricks! oh, well, be careful! [ radio announcer ] only two days to go, and several of the elves were tossed around when they tried to wrap a pony. [ female announcer ] the keepsake countdown ornament. build anticipation every day till christmas. elves tried to wrap a po
ten days or so. with the big push of cold air, you're going to feel the chill. dallas, your first frost and freeze in the dallas metro area. and new york city, dropping from the 70s in the new york city area, into probably much cooler than that, the 30s and 40s in that zone as we get the cold air. chicago feels like 16 degrees with the windchill. and atlanta, feels like 27. that's a big shot of cold air. i'm lynette charles, foggy note, a chilly note and rapeny note throughout the day. the rain will subside, but the winds will be out there, cool at 3-g, temperature coming in around 50 degrees. in to the evening times starting to get the clouds moving out of here, calling it partly cloudy to mostly clear, setting us up for sunshine on wednesday. temperatures well below average 48 degrees, sunshine towards the end of the week. >>> all right. coming up on "gma," sorry about that. the high school valedictorian on trial for his mother's murder. why his father says he's innocent. >>> plus, the double-life of the bandanna bandit. wait until you hear this story. nine days till christmas a
remember absolutely nothing. she'd been looking at christmas lights from the air north of dallas last year, when she got out of her friend's plane and inexplicably walked to the front of it. days after the accident, her mother told "gma" about that harrowing night. >> i was there to hold her. and it's the toughest part of it all. just seeing her laying there. and waiting for the help. >> reporter: she lost her left eye and part of her left arm. her memoir due out next week, is entitled "still lolo." that's her nickname. lauren focuses on her recovery, the awkward fitting and painting of her left eye. her self-consciousness of her prosthetic left arm. she writes, i don't know why this is so hard, i said. soldiers are dying in afghanistan right now. and i'm too chicken to do this one thing. the former model believes her encounter with that propeller blade may have made her a better person. she writes, i came to see how there was so much more to my life than being worried about how i looked. for "good morning america," ryan owens, abc news, dallas. >> what a great perspective. >>> speaking ab
weekend. >> greg: we could run a segment from tomorrow. >> dana: but it's 36 in chicago and 78 in dallas. there is weather on the west coast. okay. i know. >> greg: you know how you make holidays easier? stagger the holidays by last name. if you are from "a" to "m" you do thanksgiving this week. "n" to "z" you do next week. that cuts the travel in half. >> dana: we're going to get something to talk about initially. eric will catch us up. you talked about the twinkies. we have news. >> eric: we could have gone to lax. the seiu is protesting at the los angeles airport. the point is unions disrupting everything going on, including hostess. we talk about this and want to bring it on. hostess makes twinkie and wonder bread. but you cannot put because of the tempsters union you can't put bread on twinkie truck or twinkie on the bread truck. when they both go to the store to sell it, the teamster driver could not touch it. someone else has to unload it. that's why the products go up. >> greg: you can't keep them in the same truck or they would reproduce and have twinkie bread. >> dana: this is
swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country. and we have to rethink the way we spend money in politics. if this was a $6 billion election-year with status quo results, the biggest success would -- when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about message should dismiss des -- macro, it may be an effective way to pay voters directly. should dismiss demographics -- independence because they leaned democratic. the suburbs cannot be analyzed as a whole. you look nationally, romney won the suburbs by two points. look at northern virginia. it delivered -- the blue state suburbs, philadelphia whiteout romney. the suburbs also wiped out romney. new york, philadelphia, d.c., los angeles, san francisco, the suburbs were democratic. the suburbs were swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work.
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)